Citizenship

Becoming a United States citizen typically is the act of giving up citizenship of a foreign country and swearing loyalty to the United States. Once granted, United States citizenship cannot be taken from you except in extremely rare circumstances.

As a permanent resident, you have most of the rights of U.S. citizens. However, United States citizenship offers many additional rights and privileges. As a U.S. citizen you can vote, serve on a jury, travel with a U.S. passport, bring family members to the U.S., obtain citizenship for children under 18 years of age, apply for federal jobs, become an elected official, keep the right to remain in the U.S., and become eligible for federal grants and scholarships. Additionally, many criminal convictions result in deportation proceedings being brought against a lawful permanent resident, who may not have any relief from removal. Because U.S. citizens cannot be deported, U.S. citizenship can protect you in the event you are convicted of almost any crime.

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